The Costa Brava

The Costa Brava with over 200 km of coastline from the French border to the mouth of the Tordera River near Barcelona is much more than a string of beaches, coves and cliffs which form a rugged but friendly coastline.

A transit point for different cultures and a gateway to the Iberian Peninsula first for the Greeks and then for the Romans, the land of the Costa Brava is steeped in history and tradition, apart from its spectacular landscape of lush Mediterranean vegetation.

Its tourism dates back to the early 20th Century when the writer Ferran Agulló baptized it with its name by which it has now become internationally renowned..

From north to south it has small picturesque fishing villages like Port de la Selva, Cadaqués, Sa Riera, Sa Tuna, Tamariu, Llafranc or Calella de Palafrugell, for those who are lovers of the most secluded, peaceful spots.

There are larger towns which have become major tourist centres for those who want entertainment, to go shopping and nightlife like Roses, L’Escala, L’Estartit, Palamós, Platja d’Aro, Sant Feliu de Guíxols, Begur, Pals, Tossa, Lloret or Blanes are by the sea and others are just a few kilometres inland like Palafrugell or Calonge.

S’Agaró, where the elegance and the exclusivity of its architectural set, created by the architect Rafael Masó, combines with the exceptional maritime landscape bordered by the coastal path.

Further inland there are cities that offer more social and cultural activities and first class shopping facilities like Girona or Figueres.

The Costa Brava is an area where one can enjoy culture, sport or fine cuisine while staying at superb and comfortable luxury hotels.